Unicycle Brands

Okay, a unicycle is a unicycle, but why are there so many brands? Good question! Believe it or not, each manufacturer of a unicycle actually has different qualities such as strength and many others.


Alright, let's get started!

Axis

A basic beginners unicycle that offer good quality. These come from New Zealand and Australia.

Bedford

Bedford unicycles are sold in Canada, specializing in trials unicycles. Bedford offers lots of range, producing unicycles from beginner to pro.

Coker

The Coker Company makes a sturdy 36" wheel unicycle. "The Big One", which is extremely popular, for a long time was the only unicycle available with this wheel size. Now the Nimbus 36" and Qu-ax 36" are becoming more popular in Europe, possibly since Cokers are hard to get outside the US.

DM

David Mariner (UK) produced high quality giraffe, freestyle and mountain unicycles with frames made of aircraft-grade steel. He also made custom unicycles. Unfortunately no longer in business, the unicycles are still going strong.

GB4

GB4 Manufacturing produces unicycle parts and accessories.

Koxx

Koxx is a new brand in the unicycling scene. One of the best and most extreme unicyclists in France, he molded Koxx into a very fabulous new unicycle brand. They use some proven Try All parts like rims and tires.

Kris Holm

Kris Holm Unicycles, run by one of the world's leading trials and muni experts, creates several trial and mountain unicycles which are very highly regarded. They recently announced a geared hub, co-produced with Schlumpf, which has been described as cheaper, lighter, and stronger than the current Schwinn GUni.

Miyata

Miyata, a respected and experiecned Japanese cycle manufacturer produces several different 20" freestyle unicycles, as well as a 24" model. Miyata unicycles cost more than some other makers, but are very good quality.

Nimbus

Nimbus Unicycles produce a high quality range covering all styles of unicycling. Also included in the products are ultimate wheels, BC wheels and giraffes. They have recently developed their own ISIS hub for their street, freestyle and trials unicycles.

Qu-Ax

Qu-Ax are a German manufacturer. They produce unicycles of both splined and unsplined types. Their splined munis and trials unicycles are generally agreed to be about as strong as a KH. They are also much cheaper.

Schlumpf

A brand of revolutionary unicycles with a geared hub. This was the first unicycle brand that could change gears while riding.

Schwinn

Schwinn produced unicycles years ago, but stopped for financial reasons. Recently, however, they have reintroduced their unicycle line. Schwinn unicycles tend to be stronger than some other brands, but also heavier. Schwinn produces 20 and 24 inch models as well as a few giraffes.

Semcycle

Designed by unicyclist Sem Abrahams, Semcycle unicycles come in several varieties, including freestyle, giraffe, multi-wheeled, and off-road models.

Sun

A low-cost brand of unicycles mostly used by beginners. Their unicycles have a reputation for being easy to break, particularly for larger wheel sizes. However, these unicycles are great to use for people learning.

Torker

Torker produces 5 different lines of unicycles; CX, LX, DX, TX and AX. The LX and CX are two of the most popular first unicycles in the US.

CX stands for classic, and is produced with 16", 20" and 24" wheel sizes. The rim is designed for basic riding and light freestyle; it will not put up with rough use.

LX stands for luxury, and even for beginners is a much better choice than the CX. It has a fairly comfortable saddle, a stronger 48-spoke wheel, and a wider frame. It is mostly used and most commonly known for freestyle, as well as very light trials and MUni.

DX stands for deluxe. This is Torker's heaviest-duty unicycle, suitable for extreme trials, MUni, and some street if desired.

TX means tall. Torker's five-foot giraffe is one of the least expensive available.

AX stands for Aluminium. Comes in 20", 24" and 29" wheel sizes. It has a lightweight aluminum alloy frame.


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